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Nutrition-Balance-Fitness


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Competition Rebound

Caught!

Caught!

Catch you on the rebound.

So you’re about to enter your first competition. You’ve researched it, talked to everyone you know that’s ever even thought about doing one and paid a fortune for a “customized” contest diet and training program. You’ve pored over which song to use and practiced your posing in high heels until you’re sure you could play tennis in them if you had to. Protein is the main part of your diet and you’ve eaten so many green beans and spinach that you swear you might turn green yourself one day. The stair mill and you are so closely linked that you’re thinking of asking it to your cousins wedding as your plus one. You’re as ready as you will ever be both physically and mentally. (ok maybe just physically).. And you are focused on taking home the prize.

But what about after…

There is a little secret associated with fitness competitions that before now hasn’t been discussed too often — the virtually universal post-contest rebound effect. Even bodybuilding champions will gain weight after they stop the highly restrictive diets that are required to achieve the extremely low body fat levels they need to be competitive. It is something that is rarely talked about to new competitors, and therefore, rarely anticipated by them. Strict competition diets and training programs work, even for non-competitors. But the extreme results cannot — and should not— last forever. Anyone who is considering entering a competition should be prepared to deal with the physical and, more importantly, the emotional impact of returning to more normal eating.

The goal of these ultra strict pre-contest diets is to lose as much fat as possible, and for most competitors they have to do a highly restricted eating and exercise plan for 12 to 16 weeks before a competition. As the macro balance shifts towards a higher and higher protein content, carbs and fats take a back seat during this process. As the calories, carbs and fats drop off the competitor starts thinking about all the delicious foods that she/he can’t wait to eat when the show is over. I’ve even seen competitors collect massive quantities of different junk foods to eat after the show is over. Most athletes want to celebrate, or “reward” months of sacrifice by basically gorging right after the competition. Most have good intentions of keeping their eating clean post contest but few actually do. Lots of competitors also stop taking the fat burners that helped them get through the carb deprived workouts and cardio sessions, cut back on the volume of cardio or stop altogether, and decrease the intensity of their weight training sessions. They basically “take a break.” The problem is that such an abrupt change in eating patterns and workout schedules will cause the body to rebound. While in pre contest mode a competitor’s body tends to go into a starvation-survival mode, which will cause their metabolism to slow down. Then when they start to eat a few more calories, their body will store them as fat, basically stocking up for the next “famine”. Once the water starts being pulled into the muscles along with the glycogen the bodies hard, lean appearance will start smoothing out. After even just one week of less controlled eating and drastic reductions in training intensity, they will start to regain body fat. This is a classic example of yo-yo dieting. Something we associate with out of shape/overweight people, not elite athletes.
The mental game…

The biggest impact on a competitor is the psychological one. To them this kind of rebound can be emotionally devastating. they may only rebound 10-15 pounds but to someone who has been in the single body fat digits, that small increase may make them feel like an enormous failure. One day, the competitor is onstage presenting their perfectly sculpted and lean body, and a few weeks later, they feel fat, bloated, and self-conscious. Their six pack is gone, all the sexy new clothes they bought while super lean no longer fit and they feel embarrassed around all the people who have seen them lose that extreme amount of body fat. They are more critical of themselves now than any judge will ever be. When you start your diet at 20% body fat and get to 15%, you’re in heaven; from 15% to 12%, you feel like wearing a bikini all day; once you hit single digits you can’t believe the lean condition you’re in. But chances are once you begin to rebound, you feel as fat at 10% as you did at 20%.

You must understand that your standards for your body now are completely unrealistic. It’s the same as when an anorexic looks in the mirror. They do not see the truth, only a corrupted version of it. Rebounding is the reality. It is normal. And it is a mistake to believe that you can achieve and then sustain that competition look year-round. Did you know that most of the photos in fitness magazines are taken at competition time, and are not a true look at how even champion competitors look in the off-season. Competition shape is totally unnatural. Period.

For a lot of people, the only way to reverse the sense of failure they feel is to begin another competition diet. In the beginning winning, placing or simply entering a contest used to be the goal, now they are chasing an unattainable goal — physical perfection. The result can be ever increasing rebounds that act like a pendulum. Larger weight gains after followed by stricter, longer cut periods. I rarely hear about how the next competition prep was easier. It’s usually comments like “I can’t shake the fat as easy this time”. Of course in response their coach will usually make their program even more restrictive for the next show. Which simply increases that pendulum swing. It can become a vicious cycle with the competitors emotional health suffering for it.

The breakdown…

So how can you avoid this emotional and physical rollercoaster? For one you must have a more realistic, accepting view of your body, You need to realize that 12% body fat is totally acceptable, hell most people would kill for that. Second, you must go into a competition knowing that you are trying to achieve a TEMPORARY condition of leanness, and understand that your body fat will return to a more natural level. Third, if it took you 12 weeks to get into contest shape, allow at least 8 weeks to return to an eating program that you can maintain for life, slowly adding back small portions of “normal” food. If your coach doesn’t have a post contest program for both food intake and exercise get another coach. One that understands the importance of these things.

On that note, good luck at show time, enjoy yourselves and for the love of all things holy do not eat a whole pizza after the show.


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Your Behind Defined

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Your Behind Defined

Everyone wants that “perfect” butt. It’s usually at the top of the list from my clients for wanting improvement. It takes a lot of work to really build an amazing set of glutes. It doesn’t help that your glute muscles are typically not that engaged throughout the day as the quads do a lot of the heavy lifting. But step up onto a bench holding weights or climb on a rotating stairmill and watch what happens. You’ll feel the gluteus maximus doing what it was born — or rather, evolved — to do: keeping you upright as you stride, especially during more balance-challenging hikes up stairs. Among the things that differentiate us from our knuckle-dragging primate ancestors are not only our big brains but our big butts, our well-developed gluteus maximus. The ability to be bipedal is a huge deal and it’s this muscle that is responsible for that. It’s ironic, then, that the largest muscle in our body, which has given humans their signature upright strut, spends most of the day sitting on its butt.

Meet the three main muscles that make up your rear view.

  1. Gluteus Minimus: The smallest of the glute muscles lies directly under the gluteus medius.
  1. Gluteus Medius: This pork chop-shaped muscle sits near the outside of your pelvis.
  1. Gluteus Maximus: True to its name, the maximus is the biggest muscle in your body.

Your glutes are made up of three main muscles: the maximus, the biggest portion of your behind; the pork chop-shaped medius near the top of your hips; and the minimus, which is tucked beneath the two other muscles.

The gluteus maximus gets all the attention, but the medius does just as important a job. Along with the minimus, it is responsible for stabilizing your pelvis when you walk or anytime you’re off balance. Without it you would lurch from side to side like a drunken sailor as you lifted your feet.

Because everyone’s glute muscles attach at the same points on their skeleton — the maximus runs diagonally from the top of the pelvis to the femur and iliotibial band on the outside of the upper thigh — if you have a tall pelvis you may have a longer, squarer shape to your butt. With a wide pelvis, you may have a more horizontal orientation of the muscle. If your back is a bit more curved, your buns may appear more lifted. You can work on your glutes and change their size and shape but some people start off with the nicely rounded gluteal muscles that inspire pop songs, while many of us do not.

So just how much of our butt shape is predetermined by genetic roulette? Up to 70 percent of the body’s overall shape, and therefore your rear’s, is genetic. The rest is going to be influenced by nutrition, exercise, sleep, posture — anything outside your genetic code. You can thank our gender for the fact that women generally have more padding than men, and thank Mom and Dad for where that padding tends to congregate.

But no matter what shape butt you start out with, it will morph later in life. At the same body mass index a woman of 50 has a flatter butt profile than a woman half her age because of shifting hormone levels. Post-menopause signals the body to store fat in the belly rather than the buns. You’ll see less fat at the side of the butt and more up at the top of the pelvis. That’s why pants don’t fit the same way as you get older.

The good news? You can give gravity a good run for its money by getting your butt muscles firm and keeping them that way.

How to Build a Better Butt

In general, the gluteus maximus is a combination of fast-twitch muscle fibers — that is, rapid-firing fibers, which are tapped for bursts of speed or power — and slow-twitch muscle fibers, which are the workhorses during aerobic activities. Some studies suggest that the medius and minimus consist primarily of slow-twitch muscles. This means the glutes can benefit from both strength training with high load and low reps, like heavy-weight squats (to work the fast-twitch muscles), and with low load and high reps and endurance exercises, like running and stair climbing (to work slow-twitch muscles).

Of course, a big part of your butt’s appearance is dictated by the layer of fat that covers those glutes. If extra flab is obscuring yours, your surest bet to uncover its true shape is to follow a healthy diet, lift weights and add regular cardio to lose fat all over, including around your lower half.

This mix of diet, cardio, and weights will give you the best butt you can have. And that should be the goal — not J.Lo’s or the one belonging to that woman putting her head behind her ankles in yoga class. People say ‘I want her butt,’ but you can’t have it, you have yours. Instead, within your own structure, maximize what you have. And that’s something any of us who is willing to get off their butt and move can do.


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Tight Shoulders affecting your squat gains?


Ever get frustrated in the squat rack, wondering why your lifts haven’t increased? You could be trying every plateau strategy in the book, but nothing yields a substantial increase. The answer could be in an area you never expected—your shoulder flexibility.

STIFF SHOULDERS, BAD POSITIONING
Tightness in the shoulder girdle causes you to hold the bar in a position where the elbows are flared out and behind the bar from the starting position. Ideally, you want a position where you start with your elbows aligned underneath the bar. Why it’s killing your squat: When your shoulders are tight and elbows are flared back behind the bar it makes it impossible to engage your lats throughout the entire lift. Without the lats engaged you won’t be able to keep your rib cage/chest up during the lift resulting in what’s called “dumping the weight”. This is when the lifter rounds the upper back and usually falls forward shifting the weight to the quads and lumbar making for an ugly or missed lift. It also puts the lifter in a position for serious injury.
PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
Focus on pulling your elbows underneath the bar every time you squat. If done correctly you should feel as if you’re bending the bar across your back. At this point you’ll feel your lats engage and your rib cage/chest rise up. This position will eliminate the weak link in your squat and allow you to hold a tight solid position throughout the lift, resulting in more weight on the bar.
TWO SHOULDER FLEXIBILITY CURES
One: Improve shoulder mobility by increasing the time spent stretching and foam rolling this area.

Two: Take a medicine ball (not the soft sand filled ones) and place it up to a wall at chest height. Lean into the ball and let it dig into the area where the pec major (chest) meets the deltoid (shoulder). Apply pressure and roll around this area as if you were being massaged. It’s not going to feel pleasant but will do wonders in helping to loosen up that particular area. Work the roller on the area three times for 60-90 seconds per set.

Terri Windover

Certified Personal Trainer, Nutritionist & Healthy Cooking Coach

Cell: (780) 972-7447
Email: terri.windover@me.com
Web: http://www.definefit.trainerize.com
Facebook.com/DefineFitYMM
Twitter: @LiftLikeAWoman
Blog: http://www.eatloveliftblog.wordpress.com

Instagram: @Terriwindover

For free exercise videos and tips visit my youtube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYmKmo3v8z6jnkeHe9GP_yw

To check out my recipe column Definitely Delicious in the Connect Newspaper go to: http://www.fortmacconnect.ca/category/community-features/definitely-delicious

Personal Training, Online Training, Custom meal plans, body fat analysis and Learn to Cook lessons available.

26 years experience in a wide variety of techniques including:
Olympic lifting, weight loss, muscle gain, adventure race, marathon & contest prep, crossfit, kettle bells and much more.


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Food: Good vs Evil

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Food: Good vs Evil

Recently, in response to a comment I made about the calories in fruit juice, a new client said to me that fruit juice is “evil.” I am a philosopher at heart. So “evil” means something quite severe to me. Hitler and Stalin were evil. Fruit juice, not so much. I checked back with my client. No, she didn’t mean it was literally evil. Just that it’s as bad as a can of Coke. Still pretty bad, if not downright evil. Other anti-juice people will jump in to clarify further I’m sure once they read this. Juice is really, really bad FOR you. Or is it? The whole thing brings me back to the idea of moderation. We can live life by strict rules and have all sorts of forbidden foods on a black list if we like. But forbidden foods are, for many of us, more attractive for being forbidden.

I know that when I finally truly legalized all foods, french fries, which I’d considered my favorite food for all of my life, suddenly lost their appeal. They’re okay, and I do enjoy them from time to time. But are they my favorite foods? No. If I had a choice of giving up fries for the rest of my life or giving up pineapple for the rest of my life, I’d give up the fries. And not because they’re “bad” or even “bad for me,” but because I simply love a good fresh pineapple. The food police are those people who like to jump in and tell you about the evil foods that are bad for you and that you should avoid. I’m not interested in what they have to say. I am extremely well informed about nutrition and used to be able to rhyme off all sorts of fun facts about countless foods. I wrote them down every day and kept meticulous count. I avoided fruit juice and all caloric drinks so as not to waste the stingily parceled out grams of this or that. Like so many people, I felt so incredibly virtuous when I stuck with it, often for months and even years at a time. I convinced myself, as I have heard so many others do, that I just loved this way of eating. It was so great! And I was so good! Meanwhile, I felt deprived, especially around celebrations and special occasions, which are enhanced by taking a meal together. I had my false sense of virtue, but it wasn’t much fun.

I have also witnessed the effect of “virtuous” eating on others who were not so virtuous but who thought they should be. People would apologize for themselves for eating. “I shouldn’t be having this, but…” That is always a preamble to the next day’s self-flagellation, “I was so bad at my daughter’s wedding yesterday.” Or this one, “I’ll just take a sliver.” When I was a young adult, my mother and I polished off close to whole banana loaf over the course of an evening by taking little slivers. Even today I look back and think I should have just cut off a good sized slice, slathered it with butter, sat down with it, and enjoyed it. Instead, I sneaked into the kitchen a few times and shaved off inadequate pieces that left me wanting more. When we moralize foods into good, bad, evil even, we deny ourselves permission and set ourselves up not just as failures, but as moral failures.

If the foods that made people feel so bad weren’t forbidden or “sinful” in the first place, they’d be less attractive and people would be less likely to eat more of them than is comfortable. One of my favorite things to do with new clients who uncontrollably crave things like chocolate or chips is give them PERMISSION to have a serving every day for a week (gasp!) Usually by the end of the week they forget to eat it. Weird huh?

Are there any foods that, for health reasons, we simply should not eat EVER, that even in tiny amounts are “evil”? Of course, some people are allergic to things that will kill them if they eat them. And as for vegans I am keenly aware of their social, moral and political reasons for avoiding certain foods. But those foods aside, I’m not sure if there are any foods that should never, ever, under any circumstances, be eaten because of our health. And if there are, fruit juice is not among them.

Terri Windover

Certified Personal Trainer, Nutritionist & Healthy Cooking Coach

Cell: (780) 972-7447
Email: terri.windover@me.com
Web: http://www.definefit.trainerize.com
Facebook.com/DefineFitYMM
Twitter: @Liftlikeawoman
Blog: http://www.eatloveliftblog.wordpress.com

For free exercise videos and tips visit my youtube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYmKmo3v8z6jnkeHe9GP_yw

Personal Training, Online Training, Custom meal plans, body fat analysis and Learn to Cook lessons available.

26 years experience in a wide variety of techniques including:
Olympic lifting, weight loss, muscle gain, adventure race, marathon & contest prep, crossfit, kettle bells and much more.


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The Benefits of Partial Reps

What? Did she just say PARTIAL REPS? For some that sounds like blasphemy. It has gotten a seriously bad rap in the last few years and I continuously shake my head at this mentality.
Let’s talk about progressive ROM. Use a weight that’s 20-100 pounds heavier than your max (lower range for bench and press, higher range for squat and deadlift). Start with a very short range of motion, using whatever safety mechanisms your facility has.
Every couple weeks, increase your ROM slightly. Do as many reps as you can at each height, and try to equal your rep count with each downward increment. It’s probable that you’ll lose reps as the ROM increases but that’s normal. Once you’re back down to a full ROM, you should be set for a fantastic new PR.
You can thank Paul Anderson for this. One of the strongest squatters and pressers in history, and it has been used successfully by professional lifters ever since. Unfortunately most gym goers, even the serious ones never step out of their “box” far enough to try anything so out of their comfort zone. In fact I usually hear them sneer at partials.
Certain body parts stagnant? Implementing progressive ROM once per week as a second training day for a lift can bust any plateaus you’re facing. For a quarter squat, you may use up to 50%+ more weight than you can squat for a full ROM. Of course you should follow good form techniques and not heave the weight around like a gorilla shaking its cage. That goes unsaid, and yet I feel I have to say it…
Also, static holds work very well for increasing strength and lifts in the long run. For the squat, unrack the bar with about 120% of your max and simply stand with it for 3 sets of 8 seconds without locking your hips or knees. Unless you want to have your knees explode and look like a chicken when you walk, in which case have at er… That goes for bench as well – hold it at arms’ length with a very slight bend in your elbows. Please for the love of god use a spotter!
I’m amazed that these techniques have not become common place in bodybuilding as they work extremely well in powerlifting and strongman routines along with volume training and slow tempo training to create an incredible mind-body connection that is integral to increasing lift power. Remember to maximize muscle tension through out your lifts as well. This way you will have a greater chance of becoming more powerful throughout the rep as opposed to hitting that “stick point”.
I hope this encourages you to open yourself to new (actually old and proven) techniques and that you continue to play safe and work hard.

Terri Windover
Certified Personal Trainer, Nutritionist & Healthy Cooking Coach
Cell: (780) 972-7447
Email: terri.windover@me.com
Web: http://www.definefit.trainerize.com
Facebook.com/DefineFitYMM
Twitter: @LiftLikeAWoman
Blog: http://www.eatloveliftblog.wordpress.com
Instagram: @Terriwindover
For free exercise videos and tips visit my youtube channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYmKmo3v8z6jnkeHe9GP_yw
To check out my recipe column Definitely Delicious in the Connect Newspaper go to: http://www.fortmacconnect.ca/category/community-features/definitely-delicious
Personal Training, Online Training, Custom meal plans, body fat analysis and Learn to Cook lessons available.
26 years experience in a wide variety of techniques including:
Olympic lifting, weight loss, muscle gain, adventure race, marathon & contest prep, crossfit, kettle bells and much more.


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FOOD and YOUR SKIN

Food can give you glowing skin if you eat the right kinds. Here’s a list of the top foods for healthy, glowing skin.

healthy-skin

Almonds: One of my recommended foods to combat a wide variety of these dermal dilemmas is almonds. These nuts are a superfood for the skin because they’re packed with moisturizing vitamin E. They also provide defense against harmful environmental factors such as sun and toxins and they also combat premature aging. Grab a handful of these tasty (unsalted!) treats today and your skin will thank you tomorrow.

Avocados: They are an excellent source of vitamin E, an antioxidant that helps reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. They also contain vitamin C, which is necessary for the optimum production of collagen, the primary protein in the skin’s innermost layer. These fruits are also loaded with B-complex vitamins which help to calm and soothe irritated, red skin. And don’t worry if you don’t like the taste — avocados make for great face masks, too.

Berries: Not only are these brightly colored gems delicious, they are among your skin’s best buddies as well. Berries are one of the richest sources of antioxidants which help to fend off UV damage and other harmful toxins. Opt for plums, raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries for one of the most nutritious breakfasts possible. Two more to try if you’re looking to expand your palate: both the acai and goji varieties are packed with vitamins and the skin-loving antioxidants known as carotenoids. Berry good indeed!

Carrots: These crunchy snacks are sometimes referred to as the ‘herbal healer’ of skin. Carrots contain beta-carotene pigments, which when eaten, find their way into your skin, fill in blotches and give you a healthy glow. In addition to being tasty, fiber-filled treats, carrots are also loaded with vitamin A, an antioxidant which helps your skin protect against bacteria and repair or protect itself against damage. That’s what’s up, doc!

Cantaloupe: This juicy fruit is rich in vitamin A which is nourishing and healing to skin tissue. It is also packed with water so it naturally plumps up the skin cells and makes you look radiant. Another plus for this melon is that it maximizes antioxidants, and thereby helps to destroy harmful free radicals. All of this means clearer skin so be sure to add a slice or two to your breakfast menu…

Dark Chocolate: I knew this satisfying treat had to be a good thing! The flavanoids and zinc in dark chocolate are not just anti-agers, but they also help to maintain a full head of hair. In addition, dark chocolate is packed with polyphenols, or antioxidants, that help the body to rid itself of harmful cells. Polyphenols protect the skin from ultraviolet damage and also protect against skin cancer. This one’s a delicious winner!

Fish: When it comes to lean protein, it’s hard to beat fish for both nutrient value and delicious taste. The omega oils — specifically omega-3s – found in fatty fish are important constituents of the skin and boost its’ barrier by giving it a healthy thickness and glow. Best bets: sardines, tuna, and wild Alaskan salmon. Salmon contains DMAE , a neurotransmitter that stimulates muscular contraction and contouring in the face. It also contains the antioxidant astaxanthin which gives the fish its’ pink color and helps to protect against the sun and prevents age spots, too.

Flaxseed: Nature’s own wrinkle reducer, flaxseed is great for skin, both inside and out. It is chock-full of plant lignans — or phyto-nutrients – as well as omega-3 and omega-6 oils. Often found in health food stores in either powder or oil form, fiber-filled flaxseed can be easily added to recipes ranging from cookies to stews. Flaxseed is also a great choice for vegetarians who might otherwise miss out on lean proteins. The omega-3s boost the skins’ protective barrier and plump up skin cells, thereby decreasing lines and wrinkles.

Grapes: Looking for a healthy snack for the skin? Grab a bunch of grapes and let the popping begin! The antioxidants known as polyphenols found in grapes help to keep middle-aged skin from sagging by strengthening collagen. Whether eaten raw or frozen, red grapes are delicious and are packed with water, which makes them a smart snack. The healthful benefits of red grapes do extend to red wine as well, but limit yourself to one glass per day to maintain a beautiful, moisturized complexion.

Green Tea: Green tea is one of the best friends your skin can have. It’s been said that the anti-oxidant components of green tea are some of the most powerful known to man. It has polyphenols that have anti-inflammatory properties for the skin, it protects cell membranes, and helps to reduce the risk of skin cancer. Packed with antioxidants, green tea is also a diuretic which helps to flush toxins from the body and skin. Drink to your health!

Mango: Packed with Vitamin A, mangoes promote cell growth and development which leads to more youthful, smooth-looking skin. Foods rich in vitamin A such as mangoes, carrots, and sweet potatoes are known to help combat acne as well. Savor this sweet food regularly to aid digestion and to leave pores feeling clean and clear. As an added bonus, they’re full of phenols which have been shown to help fight a variety of cancers.

Mollusks: The acne terminator, zinc is found in oysters and other mollusks and can decrease acne flare-ups. Zinc also plays a major role in helping break down damaged collagen, thereby allowing new collagen to form, which in turn makes the skin look more youthful. In addition to oysters and shellfish, beef, lamb, veal and many fortified cereals are zinc-rich foods that are thought to boost the immune system.

Mushrooms: These fungi get a bad rap for causing yeast infections, but there isn’t a lot of research to support this. On the other hand, mushroom extracts have been shown to possess powerful anti-aging properties. Full of selenium, mushrooms also protect against free radicals and help to combat dry, flaky skin.

Wine: This delicious drink is your friend — up to a limit. One glass per day is good for the skin but more than that can lead to dehydration and indigestion. Red wines posses one of the best antiagers, resveratrol, which is great for promoting youthful skin. And while studies on resveratrol are ongoing, they are starting to suggest there is evidence that these supplements posses antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects.

Salmon: friend Of all the fatty fish, salmon is perhaps the best skin bet of all. Salmon is packed with omega-3 fatty acids which not only help to power your brain, but they collect in the walls of your epidermal cells to help lock in moisture and keep your skin looking plump and youthful.

Sweet Potatoes: Packed with beta-carotene — which is then converted to vitamin A — sweet potatoes are a tasty, fiber-filled treat. Sweet potatoes or yams also possess anti-inflammatory powers which calm and soothe skin that has been harmed by the environment. Low in sodium, and full of vitamins B6 and C, plus potassium, and manganese, sweet potatoes are a total winner for overall skin health.

Water: This is a no-brainer, but an important one. To keep skin looking great, you need to drink water throughout the day to stay hydrated and flush toxins from your system. You can make a meaningful difference just by drinking 16 ounces of this key skin-saver. Water also helps to keep skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis at bay, and has even been found to decrease bags under the eyes. Other options for taking on water: eat watermelon, peaches and celery, all foods that are rich in H2O.

Yogurt: All yogurts are not created equal. For skin health, go for Greek yogurt which contains active live probiotic cultures that help the skin to flourish and grow. “Your skin is a direct reflection of your intestinal health and if your insides are well and you’re digesting properly, then you’re less likely to have acne, redness, or rosacea. Yogurt is also packed with vitamin A which lends a hydrated, even tone to skin. Full of lactic acid and enzymes, low-fat yogurt is also works well as a moisturizing mask when applied directly to the face (stick to plain, not flavored varieties here!).

Terri Windover
Certified Personal Trainer, Nutritionist & Healthy Cooking Coach
Cell: (780) 972-7447
Email: terri.windover@me.com
Web: http://www.definefit.trainerize.com
Facebook.com/DefineFitYMM
Twitter: @LiftLikeAWoman
Blog: http://www.eatloveliftblog.wordpress.com
Instagram: @Terriwindover
For free exercise videos and tips visit my youtube channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYmKmo3v8z6jnkeHe9GP_yw
To check out my recipe column Definitely Delicious in the Connect Newspaper go to: http://www.fortmacconnect.ca/category/community-features/definitely-delicious
Personal Training, Online Training, Custom meal plans, body fat analysis and Learn to Cook lessons available.
26 years experience in a wide variety of techniques including:
Olympic lifting, weight loss, muscle gain, adventure race, marathon & contest prep, crossfit, kettle bells and much more.